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Gail Gibbons

Gail Gibbons Official Homepage
http://www.gailgibbons.com

Given the range of topics that Gail Gibbons has written about, there were many choices that we could have made for our website focus. In looking at her body of work, we noticed that Gibbons sometimes has chosen to dedicate entire books to a particular job or career, as in Say Woof!: The Day of a Country Veterinarian. At other times, the author may touch upon a number of jobs within one particular book, as is the case with How a House is Built. Since the author’s books are usually written for readers in the primary grades and because students in those grades often are asked to identify community workers and the goods and services they provide, we decided to collect websites which would extend the information presented in Gibbons’ texts.

See "Books Galore" to find our list of Gail Gibbons’ books.

Deadline!: From News to Newspaper
Emergency!
Farming
Fill It Up!: All About Service Stations
Fire! Fire!
How a House is Built
Pottery Place
Say Woof!: The Day of a Country Veterinarian
Weather Forecasting
Zoo
American Association of Zoo Keepers, Inc.—Zoo Keeping as a Career
http://www.aazk.org/aazknew/zoo_career.asp
Find out if you are suited to a career in zoo keeping and learn more about what it’s like to be a zoo keeper from the keeper feedback section.


American Society of Newspaper Editors—Preparing for a Career in Newspapers
http://www.asne.org/kiosk/careers/jcartxt.htm
“The American Society of Newspaper Editors offers this brief advisory to students who are considering careers as newspaper journalists.


BLS Career Information
http://stats.bls.gov/k12/html/edu_over.htm
At this site from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, students can find out about jobs based on their favorite school subject.


Building a Dream…Choosing a Career as an Architect
http://www.raic.org/career/start.html
This slide show from the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada explains why architecture matters, looks at what architects might do on a daily basis, and even recommends some high school courses for those who are considering a career in architecture.


Care for Animals
http://www.avma.org/careforanimals/animatedjourneys/aboutvets/aboutvets.asp
This animated journey from The American Veterinary Medical Association explains the work done by veterinarians and the requirements for becoming a veterinarian.


Career Zone
http://www.nycareerzone.org/graphic/index.jsp
This site, which is especially designed for middle school and high school students, provides a massive amount of information related to careers in the arts and humanities, business and information systems, engineering and technologies, health services, human and public services, and natural and agricultural sciences.
Howstuffworks—How Newspapers Work
http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/newspaper.htm
How Stuff Works uses a real example to show exactly what it takes to publish a newspaper. Included are glimpses into the production and distribution.


Kids Career Information Website
http://www.bcit.tec.nj.us/KidCareer/info.html
One of the features at this website is a worksheet that students can complete to get some help in choosing a career based on their likes and dislikes.


Kids Educational Site—What Do They Do?
http://www.whatdotheydo.com/
Over sixty different jobs, including detective, emergency medical technician, architect, carpenter, meteorologist, and sheet metal worker, are featured on this kid-friendly website.


U. S. Coast Guard and Coast Guard Reserve
http://www.gocoastguard.com/Jobs.html
At this site you can learn all about the various positions in the Coast Guard, including the two-hundred plus types of jobs that are manned by civilian personnel.


Women Firefighters’ Resource Page
http://www.wfsi.org/
Find out about the latest news on women in fire and rescue and get information and statistics on women in firefighting.






All materials featured on this site are the property of the Elementary Science Integration Projects (ESIP) and/or their respective authors, and may not be reproduced or distributed in any form, printed or electronic, without express written permission.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 9912078. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.